Introductory phrases revisited Writing & Grammar

Hello everyone:

Students sometimes come up with a plethora of introductory words and phrases. Like one student I have had recently.

In the first two paragraphs of his document, he had 3 out of 4 sentences beginning with “Although,” Additionally,” or “Further.” He visited some of those introductory words more than once.

Those are the marks of someone who is trying to use transitions but has decided to ease his way into a sentence. Within the body of a single paragraph, you do not need a transition between every single sentence.

Let me show you how to turn those phrases around, using one of my own sentences as an example.

I would take the following:

Within the body of a single paragraph, you do not need a transition between every single sentence.

And flip it around to:

You do not need a transition between every single sentence within the body of a single paragraph.

Or we could take:

Let me show you how to turn those phrases around, using one of my own sentences as an example.

And change it to:

Using one of my own sentences as an example, let me show you how to turn those phrases around.

However, please note that the second example still has an introductory phrase. We want to eliminate that introductory phrase part so we need to move some words around.

Phrases can be turned around so that you no longer have an introductory phrase. I offer my own sentence as an example.

I hope this helps!

Best,

Dr. Sheri

 


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Sheri Dean Parmelee has a Ph.D. in Communication Studies from Regent University. She writes books on practical tips for people who become unexpectedly unmarried and is working on her second novel in a series of contemporary romance/suspense novels. She teaches at three colleges, working with students from freshmen to graduate students. Her hobbies include running 8 miles a day and reading biographies and fiction.

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